1. The scattered splinters of glass find their way into people’s eyes and make them see the world as the trolls see it, and some “even got a little piece of mirror in their heart, and then it was quite dreadful. The heart would turn into a lump of ice.” It’s a narcissist’s and cynic’s mirror that freezes the heart and distorts the world.

    — Highlighted by erin kissane in The Faraway Nearby by Rebecca Solnit

  2. Burma, India, Bolivia, Cuba, New Mexico, California, Siberia, Alaska, Iceland: the red threads connect the islands and the continents that are just larger islands. In between are the ideas and conversations that connect lives and minds, when they arise, when they work, when you pay attention, when you’re lucky.

    — Highlighted by erin kissane in The Faraway Nearby by Rebecca Solnit

  3. In the same way, if he had decided that God and immortality did not exist, he would at once have become an atheist and a socialist. For socialism is not merely the labor question, it is before all things the atheistic question, the question of the form taken by atheism to-day, the question of the tower of Babel built without God, not to mount to heaven from earth but to set up heaven on earth.

    — Highlighted by erin kissane in The Brothers Karamazov by Fyodor Dostoyevsky

  4. Though these young men unhappily fail to understand that the sacrifice of life is, in many cases, the easiest of all sacrifices, and that to sacrifice, for instance, five or six years of their seething youth to hard and tedious study, if only to multiply tenfold their powers of serving the truth and the cause they have set before them as their goal—such a sacrifice is utterly beyond the strength of many of them.

    — Highlighted by erin kissane in The Brothers Karamazov by Fyodor Dostoyevsky

  5. Oh! no doubt, in the monastery he fully believed in miracles, but, to my thinking, miracles are never a stumbling-block to the realist. It is not miracles that dispose realists to belief. The genuine realist, if he is an unbeliever, will always find strength and ability to disbelieve in the miraculous, and if he is confronted with a miracle as an irrefutable fact he would rather disbelieve his own senses than admit the fact. Even if he admits it, he admits it as a fact of nature till then unrecognized by him. Faith does not, in the realist, spring from the miracle but the miracle from faith. If the realist once believes, then he is bound by his very realism to admit the miraculous also.

    — Highlighted by erin kissane in The Brothers Karamazov by Fyodor Dostoyevsky

  6. Started reading The Brothers Karamazov by Fyodor Dostoyevsky →

  7. Started reading Rumi, Fountain of Fire: Rumi poetry translations by Nader Khalili →

  8. Started reading The Woken Gods by Gwenda Bond →

  9. The self is a patchwork of the felt and the unfelt, of presences and absences, of navigable channels around the walled-off numbnesses.

    — Highlighted by erin kissane in The Faraway Nearby by Rebecca Solnit

  10. Empathy can be a story you tell yourself about what it must be like to be that other person; but its lack can also arise from narrative, about why the sufferer deserved it, or why that person or those people have nothing to do with you. Whole societies can be taught to deaden feeling, to disassociate from their marginal and minority members, just as people can and do erase the humanity of those close to them.

    — Highlighted by erin kissane in The Faraway Nearby by Rebecca Solnit